The Gables, a Three-Story Prairie Palace
       
     
 The gables home was also called mansion on the prairie.  Built prior to 1904.
       
     
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 F. E.  "Gene" Murphy is shown on the porch of his ranch house which he built in 1908.  He once owned 100 quarter-sections of Haskell County land.  This house located east of Santa Fe, later became the home of Harold Walters.  Note, the storm cellar, or "fraid hole" right.
       
     
 F. E. (Gene) Murphy and Merton Elliot - 1914  This house is still in Sublette and proudly sits on the corner of Carson and Wooten
       
     
Transporting Wheat
       
     
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SCAN0066.jpg
       
     
 Gene Murphy sitting and L. W. Murphy behind the barrel
       
     
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The Gables, a Three-Story Prairie Palace
       
     
The Gables, a Three-Story Prairie Palace

Jim Patrick had built The Gables, a three-story Prairie Palace that came to be a landmark.   The carpenter contractor was J. D. Garlock of Garden City, Kansas, the grandfather of Pauline Minor of Sublette.  It was located just across the road south from the townsite of Santa Fe, at the end of main street.  A two-story well house with the windmill on top contained a tank on its upper floor into which the water was pumped.  The water then flowed into the house creating, in effect, a pressurized water system.

Wilma (Miller) Preedy, in her handwritten memoirs remembered The Gables as a beautiful place. 

Needing attention, the house was sold at auction to Hank Hemker and Joe Meksch who razed it in the late 1930s or early '40s.  The maple flooring and other parts were used in several homes in Sublette.

 The gables home was also called mansion on the prairie.  Built prior to 1904.
       
     

The gables home was also called mansion on the prairie.  Built prior to 1904.

SCAN0071.jpg
       
     
 F. E.  "Gene" Murphy is shown on the porch of his ranch house which he built in 1908.  He once owned 100 quarter-sections of Haskell County land.  This house located east of Santa Fe, later became the home of Harold Walters.  Note, the storm cellar, or "fraid hole" right.
       
     

F. E.  "Gene" Murphy is shown on the porch of his ranch house which he built in 1908.  He once owned 100 quarter-sections of Haskell County land.  This house located east of Santa Fe, later became the home of Harold Walters.

Note, the storm cellar, or "fraid hole" right.

 F. E. (Gene) Murphy and Merton Elliot - 1914  This house is still in Sublette and proudly sits on the corner of Carson and Wooten
       
     

F. E. (Gene) Murphy and Merton Elliot - 1914

This house is still in Sublette and proudly sits on the corner of Carson and Wooten

Transporting Wheat
       
     
Transporting Wheat

The header barge, high on one side, low on the other, was used to transport the bundles of wheat from the header to the stack or to the threshing machine.  

SCAN0080.jpg
       
     
SCAN0066.jpg
       
     
 Gene Murphy sitting and L. W. Murphy behind the barrel
       
     

Gene Murphy sitting and L. W. Murphy behind the barrel

SCAN0082.jpg
       
     
SCAN0058.jpg